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DH

Digital Humanities (DH) is a scholarly discipline that deals with the use of computational methods in the study of the humanities

Resources

  • The Time Machine Project

    Iason Jongepier from the University of Antwerp and Melvin Wevers from the University of Amsterdam explore the Time Machine Project and how local Time Machine instances can help us expand our understanding of the social, environmental and economic history of the city.
  • DARIAH-DE Publikator Tutorial

    This tutorial explains the fundamentals of the DARIAH-DE Publikator, a tool which allows you to prepare, manage, and finally import your collections into the DARIAH-DE Repository using your favourite internet browser. The Repository provides the ability to store research data and enrich them with metadata. Through the use of persistent identifiers, a permanent machine-readable reference is ensured and findable via a generic search. The tutorial contains guides for users as well as technical documentation.
  • What Skills, Knowledge and Workforces are Needed into the Future?

    What skills, knowledge and workforces are needed into the future? This panel discusses interdisciplines and methods, emerging data practices and ‘Humanities 4.0’. It features presentations by Professor Jean Burgess (Director, Digital Media Research Centre, Queensland University of Technology) on Digital methods and the future of communication and media research and Professor Joy Damousi FASSA FAHA (Lead Chief Investigator) on Future Humanities Workforce project and by Associate Professor Mitchell Whitelaw (Australian National University).
  • Transformations: What are the Big Challenges and Opportunities for Data-intensive Research?

    What are the big challenges and opportunities for data-intensive research over the next ten years? This panel discusses digital transformations in the humanities and arts, data ethics and sovereignty, and infrastructure with impact. It features presentations by Dr James Rose (Indigenous Studies Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health) on Data Sovereignty in a Colonial Context: Towards an Integrated National Governance Framework for Australia, Dr James Smithies (Director, King’s Digital Lab) on Integrating DH into the longue durée: Research Laboratories, History, Methods.
  • Cowboys and Consortia: Thoughts on DH Infrastructure

    In this lecture, Quinn Dombrowski shares her thoughts on Digital Humanities Infrastructure, with a special focus on sustainability. She argues that solidarity (i.e. recognition of the interests of the larger group) is a prerequisite for the sustainability of DH infrastructures.
  • What Are We Talking about When We Talk about Data in the Humanities?

    Data as a term is too flat an ontology for the kinds of things that we are all dealing with, argues Sally Wyatt in this keynote lecture. It reduces people, events, objects to things, bits, to be imagined as impersonal, scientific and neutral. Also, she contends, the use of the word 'data' tends to assume that everything is digital. In this keynote, she explains her argument that this is wrong and asks: 'what are we talking about when we talk about data in the humanities?'
  • What Does Data Want?

    Many academic disciplines use data science to analyze contemporary culture. The question posed by Lev Manovich in this lecture is: shall we continue to aggregate big cultural data and reduce it to a small set of patterns? Or shall we refuse this dominant paradigm instead and focus on diversity, variability and differences (including tiny ones), i.e., work on big cultural data without aggregation and with attention to what is infrequent and outliers?
  • Open Science is Just Good Science

    In this lecture, Jon Tennant argues that 'Open Science' is 'good science', because it promotes transparency, reproducibility, and public good. However, he argues, researchers are not rewarded for doing good science. Tennant asks: 'how can we all work together to kick-start a new culture of open scientific practices, without putting our best and brightest at risk? How do we want people in the future to see this pivotal time in the history of science?' He challenges the audience to answer the question: 'which side do you want to be on?'
  • Applying Modern Data Analytics to Classical Questions in the Humanities

    Mikko Tolonen was the first keynote speaker at the DARIAH Annual Event 2016. His talk was entitled 'Applying modern data analytics to classical questions in the humanities: a perspective from Finland'. It drew attention to the benefits of interdisciplinarity and effective communication between 'centred' disciplines for research in the digital humanities
  • DARIAH Winter School 2016: 'Open Data Citation'

    The DARIAH Winter School 'Open Data Citation for Social Sciences and Humanities' brought together researchers, professionals with various backgrounds, and students from 15 countries. In total 38 people met in Prague, Czech Republic, to learn about various aspects of open access and open data, as well as many other subjects on digital research.