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DARIAH

DARIAH is a pan-European infrastructure for arts and humanities scholars working with computational methods. It supports digital research as well as the teaching of digital research methods.

Posts

  • Intellectual Property Rights in Ethically Open Science

    In this lecture, Teresa Scassa examines the complex role of intellectual property(IP) rights in the creation and advancement of academic knowledge. While IP rights can create barriers to access, reuse and transparency, she argues, they can also further creativity and innovation by providing revenue, and by protecting other values such as privacy/confidentiality, and integrity/authenticity. IP rights can also, in some circumstances, protect against the exploitation of individuals and communities. Framing IP rights in terms of a sometimes complex web of relationships, this presentation asks what role IP rights should play in ethically open science.
  • Open Science is Just Good Science

    In this lecture, Jon Tennant argues that 'Open Science' is 'good science', because it promotes transparency, reproducibility, and public good. However, he argues, researchers are not rewarded for doing good science. Tennant asks: 'how can we all work together to kick-start a new culture of open scientific practices, without putting our best and brightest at risk? How do we want people in the future to see this pivotal time in the history of science?' He challenges the audience to answer the question: 'which side do you want to be on?'
  • Applying Modern Data Analytics to Classical Questions in the Humanities

    Mikko Tolonen was the first keynote speaker at the DARIAH Annual Event 2016. His talk was entitled 'Applying modern data analytics to classical questions in the humanities: a perspective from Finland'. It drew attention to the benefits of interdisciplinarity and effective communication between 'centred' disciplines for research in the digital humanities
  • DARIAH Winter School 2016: 'Open Data Citation'

    The DARIAH Winter School 'Open Data Citation for Social Sciences and Humanities' brought together researchers, professionals with various backgrounds, and students from 15 countries. In total 38 people met in Prague, Czech Republic, to learn about various aspects of open access and open data, as well as many other subjects on digital research.
  • DARIAH Pathfinder to Data Management Best Practices in the Humanities

    This DARIAH Guide brings together tools, videos, short articles and other training materials that might be relevant when reflecting on your data management processes both in the immediate context of your research and in their broader disciplinary context. Its aim is to equip you with tools and practical advice, but more importantly, with conceptual twists that will help you to establish ethically committed, optimal and as open as possible research and data management workflows.
  • DARIAH can help researchers to use digital methods at every stage of their research

    Maija Paavolainen explains the challenges of finding a 'common language' in the digital humanities. She finds that simply talking about this issue helps. Thus, experience in communicating across disciplines is a positive outcome of training initiatives in itself. The role of research infrastructures, she argues, is certainly in sharing tools and best practices. However, most importantly, it is also to create opportunities for people to meet and learn face-to-face. She explains that humanities scholars are more accustomed to using digital methods and tools in the initial (information gathering) and final (publication) stages of research. However, DARIAH, specifically, can help them to also use them in the core part of the research process - i.e. in organising, annotating, and enriching data.
  • From Literary History to Digital Research Infrastructure: Pushing Beyond Boundaries

    In this video, Jennifer Edmond gives us insights into her background in critical theory approaches and German literary history, through a spell in technical support and research strategy in the humanities, and how this has impacted her work in DARIAH. She talks about the importance of pushing beyond the foundations of your academic training to do new things in the humanities. How can the system vaildate this kind of groundbreaking research, and make it possible for early career researchers to make the leap? She explains the unique role of DARIAH in this process.
  • One phrase that appears again and again is: 'continuous training'

    Claire Clivaz explains how she has found that the tensions between disciplines in interdisciplinary work can be similar no matter what disciplines are being combined. Encounters between biology and computing, for example, can be as challenging as between humanities disciplines and computing. Dr Clivaz, herself, began her academic career in biblical manuscript studies but developed an interest in the digital humanities very quickly, at a time when the impact of computing was being felt in the humanities more widely. She explains the usefulness of the DH Course Registry in finding university-based, formal, DH training in Switzerland. However, she argues that informal opportunities to learn are crucial. One phrase that appears again and again in the digital humanities, she states, is: continuous training.
  • Research Infrastructures are Vital in Providing Hands-on training

    Building on an unusual interdisciplinary background that combined computer science and literature in equal measure, Frank Fischer found his place in the digital humanities. In this video, he explains how his background has enabled him to understand 'both sides' of a digital humanities project - i.e. the humanities and the technical. He discusses the distinction between formal and informal education, arguing that the more 'alternative' teaching methods used in the digital humanities (workshops, summer schools etc) are crucial in developing new skills. Finally, he discusses how research infrastructures are vital in providing this kind of hands-on training, since they synthesise the 'social' and the 'technical'.
  • Research Infrastructures Should Inspire, Theoretically and Practically

    Agiatis Benardou began her academic career with degrees in ancient history, and her first employment was in cultural organisations. She met and was hired by a scholar who introduced her to digitisation projects and as a result she was exposed to the 'digital world'. Dr Bernardou became involved in preparing DARIAH as a project, and her experience in digitisation was useful in her professional transition into work in a research infrastructure. She argues that research infrastructures are all about people. They should focus on inspiring researchers theoretically, and also practically by exposing them to the most state-of-the-art tools and techniques.