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Research infrastructures

Research Infrastructures are (virtual) meeting points for researchers in a broad disciplinary field to share, collaborate, network, develop and contribute solutions to the research needs of researchers in their community

Resources

  • DARIAH Winter School 2016: 'Open Data Citation'

    The DARIAH Winter School 'Open Data Citation for Social Sciences and Humanities' brought together researchers, professionals with various backgrounds, and students from 15 countries. In total 38 people met in Prague, Czech Republic, to learn about various aspects of open access and open data, as well as many other subjects on digital research.
  • Citizen Science in the (Digital) Arts and Humanities

    This module looks at the variety of practices within ‘citizen science’, how you as a humanist might get started working with them, what issues you should be wary of along the way and how Research Infrastructures can potentially help you.
    Authors
    • Jennifer Edmond
    • Eliza Papaki
    • Erzsébet Tóth-Czifra
    Read more
  • Create Impact with your e-Humanities and e-Heritage Research

    This is a record of a webinar dedicated to the phase of the Research Lifecycle “Publish Results”. It covers several aspects related to successfully drafting and implementing a publication and dissemination strategy taking into account specific Research Infrastructural aspects.
  • How to Work Together Successfully with e-Humanities and e-Heritage Research Infrastructures

    This is a record of a webinar dedicated to the phase of the research life cycle “Plan Research Project”. It first introduces the participants to an understanding of the advantages and practicalities of research collaboration in and with Research infrastructures. It then dives into details of project planning, touches upon the basics of the FAIR principles, and focuses especially on the importance of using standards in Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage research and how to identify relevant standards for the participants’ own research. This webinar gives an introduction to the Standards Survival Kit that is developed within PARTHENOS. It also cross-links to other materials developed within PARTHENOS and by the PARTHENOS Cluster Partners.
  • e-Humanities and e-Heritage Research Infrastructures: Beyond Tools

    This is a record of a webinar providing a theoretical basis for a general understanding of the digital and infrastructural turn in the (Digital) Humanities and Cultural Heritage along with theoretical and critical reflections around the topic: Which opportunities and challenges do Cultural Heritage and Digital Humanities Research Infrastructures offer for research(ers)?
  • Make It Happen - Carrying Out Research and Analysing Data

    This is a record of a webinar dedicated to the phases of the research lifecycle “Carry out Research” & “Analyse Data” in the context of a research infrastructure. Carrying out research and analysis in the context of a research infrastructure requires a change in approach to research, where the harmonization of data and the ability to access and deploy interoperable services is crucial. This webinar gives an overview of the necessary elements required to set up a sustainable research infrastructure with regards to the management of data and services.
  • DARIAH can help researchers to use digital methods at every stage of their research

    Maija Paavolainen explains the challenges of finding a 'common language' in the digital humanities. She finds that simply talking about this issue helps. Thus, experience in communicating across disciplines is a positive outcome of training initiatives in itself. The role of research infrastructures, she argues, is certainly in sharing tools and best practices. However, most importantly, it is also to create opportunities for people to meet and learn face-to-face. She explains that humanities scholars are more accustomed to using digital methods and tools in the initial (information gathering) and final (publication) stages of research. However, DARIAH, specifically, can help them to also use them in the core part of the research process - i.e. in organising, annotating, and enriching data.
  • From Literary History to Digital Research Infrastructure: Pushing Beyond Boundaries

    In this video, Jennifer Edmond gives us insights into her background in critical theory approaches and German literary history, through a spell in technical support and research strategy in the humanities, and how this has impacted her work in DARIAH. She talks about the importance of pushing beyond the foundations of your academic training to do new things in the humanities. How can the system vaildate this kind of groundbreaking research, and make it possible for early career researchers to make the leap? She explains the unique role of DARIAH in this process.
  • One phrase that appears again and again is: 'continuous training'

    Claire Clivaz explains how she has found that the tensions between disciplines in interdisciplinary work can be similar no matter what disciplines are being combined. Encounters between biology and computing, for example, can be as challenging as between humanities disciplines and computing. Dr Clivaz, herself, began her academic career in biblical manuscript studies but developed an interest in the digital humanities very quickly, at a time when the impact of computing was being felt in the humanities more widely. She explains the usefulness of the DH Course Registry in finding university-based, formal, DH training in Switzerland. However, she argues that informal opportunities to learn are crucial. One phrase that appears again and again in the digital humanities, she states, is: continuous training.
  • Research Infrastructures are Vital in Providing Hands-on training

    Building on an unusual interdisciplinary background that combined computer science and literature in equal measure, Frank Fischer found his place in the digital humanities. In this video, he explains how his background has enabled him to understand 'both sides' of a digital humanities project - i.e. the humanities and the technical. He discusses the distinction between formal and informal education, arguing that the more 'alternative' teaching methods used in the digital humanities (workshops, summer schools etc) are crucial in developing new skills. Finally, he discusses how research infrastructures are vital in providing this kind of hands-on training, since they synthesise the 'social' and the 'technical'.