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DARIAH

DARIAH is a pan-European infrastructure for arts and humanities scholars working with computational methods. It supports digital research as well as the teaching of digital research methods.

Posts

  • EOSC for Arts and Humanities Scholars

    As part of the DARIAH Friday Frontiers in-house webinar series, Erzsébet Tóth-Czifra and Laure Barbot provide an introduction to EOSC and open science projects for researchers and practitioners working in the Arts and Humanities. They include a brief walk through the EOSC landscape, and how different EOSC projects are working towards ensuring open science for all.
  • Knowledge Design

    In this lecture from the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage (ADCH-CH), Jeffrey Schnapp outlines the main questions which Knowledge Design is concerned with. Schnapp provides an overview of the current situation of boundaries between libraries, museums, archives, and the classroom becoming growing porous. Additionally, he explores the role of knowledge in Digital Humanities, and which methods and tools are ideal for efficient knowledge extraction.
  • Polifonia - Making sense of musical heritage on the web

    Polifonia is a H2020 project that aims at harmonising diverse information sources in the landscape of musical heritage and scholarship. The challenges are many, from data management, to knowledge organisation and dissemination barriers. In this talk, an ontology driven strategy to organise, share, and interact with the wealth of music data on the web, is presented. This include solutions to engage with scholars and lay persons, with an emphasis on data visualisation and storytelling.
  • What 300-Dimensional Fridges Can Tell Us about Language

    In this lecture from the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage (ADCH-CH), Dirk Hovy gives an introduction to the method called embeddings, and showcases several applications of it. Hovy shows how they capture regional variation at an intra- and interlingual level, how they distinguish varieties and linguistic resources, and how they allow for the assessment of changing societal norms and associations.
  • Archiving Activism - Archiving Reproductive Health

    This video presentation from Clare Lanigan at the Digital Repository of Ireland (DRI) on the 'Archiving Reproductive Health' project, and discusses archival activism more broadly. In particular she gives a demonstration of the current collections available through the archive, provides details of how items were compiled, and also discusses the more pastoral and welfare issues for archival staff when dealing with items relating to political or social activism.
  • Things that Poems Taught me about Visualization

    In this lecture from the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage (ADCH-CH), Miriah Meyer reflects on the question "why work with humanists as a computer scientist". She expands on how interdisciplinary collaborations with poetry scholars have shaped her own research thinking.
  • Dublin in the Archives: Digital collections exploring the city and county

    This webinar is a lively discussion of archival collections containing rich material relating to Dublin, ranging from ‘ghost signs’ that illustrate the hidden history of Dublin’s commercial past, historical collections on key events in our shared history like the 1916 Rising, community-based films that showcase the contemporary social history of the city, photographs that provide insight into the fascinating heritage of communities like the Dublin Port docklands, and much more.
  • Visual Analytics - Enabling Images to Speak for Themselves

    In this lecture from the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage (ADCH-CH), Björn Ommer discusses Visual Analytics's concern of how to teach machines to enable visuals to speak for themselves. Pointing out the current inadequacy of research tools in the humanities, Ommer discusses questions such as "How would research in the humanities benefit if computers could handle images just as competently as they presently process text?"
  • How to share your research using Social Media

    Social media platforms such as Twitter, Instagram, Reddit, and Facebook can be great places for academics to share their research and reach new audiences. In this video, Dr Bob Nicholson (Edge Hill University, UK) will demonstrate the techniques he uses to share his research on Twitter.
  • Shaping the Unseen - Behind the Scenes of Data Visualization

    In this lecture from the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage (ADCH-CH), Jan Willem Tulp gives an overview of data visualisation as a type of data representation. Additionally, he discusses types of visualisation such as impression or experience as well as case studies, such as the European Space Agency or Tulp's project on 2012 national elections in the Netherlands.
  • Looking for Revolution in the Data Pool

    In this lecture from the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage (ADCH-CH), Keith Baker addresses the Digital Humanities dimensions of two projects ('Writing Rights' and 'Revolutionizing Revolution') against the academic background at Stanford. This lecture gives special attention to exploring the possibilities of digital archives as well as visualisation in the field of history.