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Training and education

How does (digital) humanities-based research support, facilitate and contribute to training, education and continued professional development?

Resources

  • Multilingual Vocabularies for SSH

    This training event from the TRIPLE Project is jointly organised with the SSHOC Project and is dedicated to the creation, use and management of controlled vocabularies in the SSH. In this training session, the presenters highlight the need for multilingual SSH vocabularies and provide answers to the following questions: What are SSH Vocabularies and why are they so important; How to create a multilingual SSH Vocabulary (The TRIPLE case); How to build an interoperable infrastructure for vocabularies (The SSHOC case).
    Authors
    • Daan Broeder
    • Nikos Vasilogamvrakis
    • Iraklis Katsaloulis
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  • The Importance of User-Centred Design for Open Science Training

    This training event is devoted specifically to giving an understanding of the importance of the co-design process and the impact it has on the development of digital tools such as the GoTriple Discovery platform. It provides insight on the importance of end-user needs in the design of a discovery platform, the methods used in the TRIPLE Project to consider user needs and showcases the next steps for the GoTriple platform now that the Beta version is released.
    Authors
    • Paula Forbes
    • Francesca Di Donato
    • Lottie Provost
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  • Visual Data Discovery for the SSH Context

    The training session is dedicated to Visual Data Discovery in the Social Sciences and Humanities and shows how the GoTriple platform will support exploring research topics with visual search. The added value of knowledge maps and streamgraphs for research discovery are also examined.
  • EOSC State of the Art and Perspectives Training

    This training event from the TRIPLE Project was devoted specifically to the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) and provided answers to the following questions, among others: What is the state of the art of the EOSC development? How is the EOSC governance changing ? What are the next steps for the EOSC implementation?
    Authors
    • Suzanne Dumouchel
    • Erzsébet Tóth-Czifra
    • Francesca Di Donato
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  • Engaging Communities with Archives

    This webinar focuses on participatory projects that aim to train or support community groups in using video to tell personal stories, bring about social change, or archive and preserve activism and advocacy work.
  • Using Digital Archives for Historical Research

    This video recording is of 'Using Digital Archives for Historical Research', the first webinar in a three-part public lecture series hosted by the Digital Repository of Ireland (DRI) aimed at early career researchers. The webinar showcases the rich research resources contained in digital archival collections that can be used to advance historical research.
  • Flipped Classrooms

    In this screencast, Dr. Jonny Johnston and Kevin O'Connor from Trinity College Dublin (TCD) discuss and demonstrate the ‘Flipped Classroom’ approach to teaching and training, exploring how the use of asynchronous methods can open up more in-classroom discussion, and what technologies can best support this.
  • Design Based Research in Educational Contexts

    In this lecture, Tony Hall examines design-based research (DBR) in educational contexts and settings. Drawing on key contemporary concepts and literature in educational design research, he focuses on how design-based research can be adapted and adopted, both to develop and deploy bespoke educational innovations and technologies.
  • What Skills, Knowledge and Workforces are Needed into the Future?

    What skills, knowledge and workforces are needed into the future? This panel discusses interdisciplines and methods, emerging data practices and ‘Humanities 4.0’. It features presentations by Professor Jean Burgess (Director, Digital Media Research Centre, Queensland University of Technology) on Digital methods and the future of communication and media research and Professor Joy Damousi FASSA FAHA (Lead Chief Investigator) on Future Humanities Workforce project and by Associate Professor Mitchell Whitelaw (Australian National University).
  • DARIAH can help researchers to use digital methods at every stage of their research

    Maija Paavolainen explains the challenges of finding a 'common language' in the digital humanities. She finds that simply talking about this issue helps. Thus, experience in communicating across disciplines is a positive outcome of training initiatives in itself. The role of research infrastructures, she argues, is certainly in sharing tools and best practices. However, most importantly, it is also to create opportunities for people to meet and learn face-to-face. She explains that humanities scholars are more accustomed to using digital methods and tools in the initial (information gathering) and final (publication) stages of research. However, DARIAH, specifically, can help them to also use them in the core part of the research process - i.e. in organising, annotating, and enriching data.
  • From Literary History to Digital Research Infrastructure: Pushing Beyond Boundaries

    In this video, Jennifer Edmond gives us insights into her background in critical theory approaches and German literary history, through a spell in technical support and research strategy in the humanities, and how this has impacted her work in DARIAH. She talks about the importance of pushing beyond the foundations of your academic training to do new things in the humanities. How can the system vaildate this kind of groundbreaking research, and make it possible for early career researchers to make the leap? She explains the unique role of DARIAH in this process.