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Resources

  • Spatial Image Analytics

    EN
    Do you work with digital images in a humanities discipline? Are you interested in exploring the spatial properties of your dataset but don't know how? Or maybe you are just curious on the topic. This workshop aims to introduce participants to the technologies and technical abilities required for the spatial exploration of image datasets and is of interest to a variety of digital humanities students, scholars and professionals.
  • Text, Versions and the Editorial Impulse

    EN
    This video features Paul Eggert, Martin J. Svaglic Endowed Chair in Textual Studies, Department of English, Loyola University Chicago, talking about textual studies and the study of versions as a methodology to ask questions revealing the lifespan of a text.
  • Textual Scholarship

    EN
    This video features Dr. James Cummings, University of Oxford, Dr. Anne Baillot, Centre Marc Bloch, Dr. Marjorie Burghart, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique CNRS, Prof Kenneth M. Price, University of Nebraska, and Prof Elena Pierazzo, Université Grenoble Alpes, interpreting what is textual scholarship and textual criticism.
  • We Are a 'People Infrastructure' and Training is Crucial to That

    EN
    In this video, Laurent Romary gives his perspective on training and education in research infrastructures. He reveals how his engineering background taught him precision in analysing computer concepts, and how this has impacted on his role in a humanities research infrastructure. He proceeds to focus on DARIAH's role as a 'people infrastructure' and the importance of training in that. He considers the importance of adaptability of training to learners from differents scholarly communities and competence levels.
  • We Should Think More About Learning Environments

    EN
    In this video, Sinai Rusinek explains her background in philosophy, together with her experience of the material text from work in the library. In her postdoctoral career, she began to seek out digital techniques that had not been available to her in her single-disciplinary studies. Dr Rusinek reveals that her own source of learning was at international workshops, including one organised by DARIAH-DE. She found this mode of learning inspiring in organising her own workshops and hackathons in Israel. She recommends that we should all think more about learning environments and how we learn best, collaboratively. Possibly, she recommends, we should organise more 'hackathon-like' events.
  • You don't have to be a programmer, but being technically equipped is important in the digital humanities

    EN
    Martin Lhoták first began digital research in an IT department, which formed his connection with information systems and databases, as well as the development of software tools and the digital humanities. Unlike many librarians, he does not have a humanist background, but instead a technical education, so finds that he speaks differently from the humanities scholars he works with. However he finds interactions with these scholars interesting and inspiring. Regarding training, he argues that being technically knowledgeable - though not necessarily a programmer themselves - is essential for doing research in the digital humanities.
  • Researchers Have to Talk a Lot, Exchange Ideas - to Try to Understand Each Other

    EN
    Salvador Ros has a background in physics and computer science, and is now working in the digital humanities. Humanities scholars and scientists have different ways of thinking, he points out in this video. This can be a problem, he finds. Both sides lack knowledge about each other's disciplines, so researchers have to talk a lot, exchange ideas - to try to understand each other. Humanities scholars who want to conduct digital research need to know at least the basic concepts of the relevant programming languages, he argues. He ends by discussing the definition and roles of a 'research infrastructure' such as DARIAH, especially in facilitating digital tools and how to use them in relation to our research questions.
  • Digital Humanities Research Questions and Methods

    EN
    This module is dedicated to developing research questions in the Digital Humanities (DH), especially on finding, working with, and contributing data to digital collections and using digital Research Infrastructures (RIs).
  • Digitising Dictionaries

    EN
    This course is an introduction to the theories, practices, and methods of digitizing legacy dictionaries for research, preservation and online distribution. It focuses on a particular technique of modeling and describing lexical data using eXtensible Markup Language (XML) in accordance with the Guidelines of the Text Encoding Initiative, a de-facto standard for text encoding among humanities researchers.
  • Open Education and MOOCs

    EN
    This video features Prof. Graeme Earl, Director of Enterprise and Impact (Humanities), University of Southampton, talking about the benefits and challenges of Open Education and Massive Open Online Courses.