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Resources

  • How to Learn and Love Digital Text in Four Easy Steps

    EN
    Is ChatGPT unsettling you? Are you annoyed to always land on the same webportal when googling for a specific book? Do you hate it when just the one page you need to consult is nowhere to be found on the internet? This presentation by Anne Baillot is for you!
  • Using Named Entity Recognition to Enhance Access to a Museum Catalog

    EN
    This blog discusses the applicability of services such as automatic metadata generation and semantic annotation for automatic extraction of person names and locations from large datasets. This is demonstrated using Oral History Transcripts provided by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM).
  • Spatial Queries and the First Deportations from Slovakia

    EN
    In the late 1930s, just before war broke in Europe, a series of chaotic deporations took place expelling thousands of Jews from what is now Slovakia. As part of his research, Michel Frankl investigates the backgrounds of the deported people, and the trajectory of the journey they were taken on. This practical blog describes the tools and processes of analysis, and shows how a spatially enabled database can be made useful for answering similar questions in the humanities, and Holocaust Studies in particular.
  • Geographical Text Analysis

    EN
    Geographical Text Analysis (GTA) is a relatively recent development in the approach to studying, analysing, and extracting the content of textual sources that offers a new method for combining techniques from Natural Language Processing (NLP), Corpus Linguistics, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Humanities research. This module offers a step-by-step guide with real data, with a focused interest in querying the geographic nature of textual sources, and analysis of spatial information on a large scale.
    Authors
    • Katherine Bellamy
    • Piraye Hacıgüzeller
    • Rebecca Kahn
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  • Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL)

    EN
    Many tools and examples that are of interest to those wishing to explore, experiment, and develop projects for digital humanities or data analysis and other tasks are based on a Linux operating system. Mac iOS laptops support Linux fairly easily. However, until recently, Windows OS users have had difficulty in accessing programs and techniques that require a Linux operating system. This short tutorial will demonstrate a simple way for most Windows 10 users to run Linux programs and systems through Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL).
  • Extracting CSV Data from the EHRI Search API

    EN
    The EHRI (European Holocaust Research Infrastructure) Search API provides a way to retrieve information about items in the EHRI portal in JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) format by making HTTP requests to particular URLs. This short tutorial shows learners how use a command line tool (CuRL) to fetch structured data and transform it into CSV (comma separated values) format for import into a spreadsheet like Excel or Google Docs.
  • Queens of Humanities

    EN
    How do we tell the story of humanities as the essence of understanding humankind in all its aspects and bring it back to the table as an equal partner of science? Seeking an answer to this question, this webinar (delivered as part of the DARIAH Friday Frontiers series) presents the scope and dissemination of the Queens of Humanities campaign that ran in 2022, led by OPERAS-PL. Its purpose was to promote innovative humanistic approaches and show their relevance in today’s world.
  • Importing tables from websites into spreadsheets

    EN
    Sometimes it can be useful to take information from a website, such as document lists from archives, for future reference. This short resource will show the user how to download an extension to copy tables from websites and then import the table into a spreadsheet program.
  • Using OpenCV for Face Detection

    EN
    OpenCV is a very popular, free and open source software system used for a large variety of computer vision applications. This article is intended to help you get started in experimenting with OpenCV using an example of face detection in images as a case study.
  • Building and Linking Humanities' Digital Spatial Infrastructures

    EN
    This workshop, focussing on "Spatial data medieval to modern", is the first of a series of workshops from the NOS-HS project "Linking, Building, and Sustaining Humanities Digital Spatial Infrastructures for Research in the Nordic Countries". The main aims of this workshop were to define key concepts (spatial infrastructures, Linked Open Data, metadata, ontology), outline major challenges in the field, and to provide an opportunity to share experiences of addressing the issues in individual and national projects across the Nordic countries.
    Authors
    • Alexandra Petrulevich
    • Sara Ellis Nilsson
    • Peder Gammeltoft
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  • quod: A Tool for Querying and Organising Digitised Historical Documents

    EN
    This blog post from EHRI introduces 'quod' (querying OCRed documents), a prototype Python-based command line tool for OCRing and querying digitised historical documents, which can be used to organise large collections and improve information about provenance. To demonstrate its use in context, this blog takes the reader through a case study of the International Tracing Service, showing workflows and the steps taken from start to finish.