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Resources

  • Introduction to Digital Humanities

    This course brings together established and emerging scholars from different parts of the world, fields and disciplines, theoretical and methodological traditions, who demonstrate the diversity of Digital Humanities by critically approaching schools of thought, methods, tools, standards, projects, and teaching practices in a series of videos.
  • Manage, Improve and Open Up Your Research Data

    This module looks at emerging trends and best practice in data management, quality assessment and IPR issues. It looks at policies regarding data management and their implementation, particularly in the framework of a Research Infrastructure.
  • Mixed Reality and Social Engagement

    This video features Tamar Gordon, Professor of Anthropology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA. In this video she discusses Mixed Reality and Social Engagement. Tamar talks about Augmented Reality as a tool that can make history come alive, while helping us to interpret cultural-historical environments and reflect upon our own experience and subject position within our own society.
  • Multimodal Literacies

    This course invites you to discover the world of digital multimodal literacies through history, examples, experiments and editing tools. In the last unit you will be able to build your own multimodal editing tool, an eTalk.
  • My Digital Humanities: A Feminist Reading

    This video features Laura Mandell, Professor of English and Director of the Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture a Texas A&M University. Laura defines feminism from a Digital Humanities perspective arguing for a need to adjust practices so that they are not replicating the sexist infrastructure of the traditional academy and business world.
  • My Digital Humanities: Visualising Text

    This video features Geoffrey Rockwell, Professor of Philosophy and Humanities Computing at the University of Alberta, Canada and Stéfan Sinclair, Associate Professor of Digital Humanities at McGill University. Their discussion involves text visualisation within Digital Humanities, thus emphasising, that visualisation is not the end product, but an intellectual process of thinking and interpreting text.
  • Introduction to Research Infrastructures

    By the end of this training module, you will be able to: understand the elements of common definitions of research infrastructures; be able to discuss the importance of issues such as sustainability and interoperability; understand how research infrastructure supports methods and communities; and be aware of some common critiques of digital research infrastructures in the Humanities.
  • Formal Ontologies: A Complete Novice's Guide

    This module is specifically aimed at those who are not yet familiar with ontologies as a means of research data management, and will take you through some of the main features of ontologies, and the reasons for using them.