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Resources

  • Using Digital Archives for Social Sciences Research

    This video recording is of 'Using Digital Archives for Social Sciences Research', the third and final webinar in a three-part public lecture series hosted by the Digital Repository of Ireland (DRI), aimed at early career researchers. The webinar showcases the rich research resources contained in digital archival collections that can be used to advance social sciences research.
  • Scholarly Primitives 20 Years Later

    In a keynote lecture at the DARIAH Annual Event 2020, John Unsworth revisited his seminal concept of scholarly primitives as the foundation of research activities across disciplines, theoretical frameworks or eras.
  • David Boder: From Wire Recordings to Website

    Understanding how digitisation of legacy data and digital technologies involved in those processes is key for a critical appraisal of digital history. This lesson examines the transformation of information from analogue to digital, using a collection of wire-recorded interviews conducted by psychologist David Boder in 1946 as a basis.
  • Flipped Classrooms

    In this screencast, Dr. Jonny Johnston and Kevin O'Connor from Trinity College Dublin (TCD) discuss and demonstrate the ‘Flipped Classroom’ approach to teaching and training, exploring how the use of asynchronous methods can open up more in-classroom discussion, and what technologies can best support this.
  • From the Archival to the Digital Turn: A Lesson on Source Criticism

    Have you ever reflected on the origin and authenticity of a historical source that you retrieved from the web? This lesson offers insights into how the practice of applying source criticism has been affected by the digital turn. What are the new questions that historians should ask of digitised and digital-born historical sources, and what new skills should they master to be able to answer these questions?
  • The Time Machine Project

    Iason Jongepier from the University of Antwerp and Melvin Wevers from the University of Amsterdam explore the Time Machine Project and how local Time Machine instances can help us expand our understanding of the social, environmental and economic history of the city.
  • The TEI Guidelines: Born to be Open

    In this lecture from the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage (ACDH-CH), Laurent Romary outlines the main issues related to open science in the current scholarly landscape while showing how the Text Encoding Initative (TEI) has been seminal in setting up an open agenda for managing, documenting or disseminating scholarly sources and methods.
  • How to Practice Design Thinking and Making

    Design thinking is much less about knowing and much more about doing: it is learning what is needed by creating it. This course is designed to help students and professionals to apply the principles of design thinking in developing their own projects.
  • Storytelling for Digital Narratives and Blended Spaces

    This interdisciplinary course addresses how principles of textual, visual, oral, and place-based storytelling challenge and enhance the conceptualisation, construction and experience of digitally-created worlds connecting to real-world places, locations, and landscapes.
  • Remaking Material Culture in 3D

    This course is designed to develop your knowledge of the theory and practice of digitising material culture by producing computer generated and printed 3D models.